Net Neutrality vote could result in higher costs and less internet access

Net Neutrality internet vote imminent

The FCC votes tomorrow on removing net neutrality rules.

    It's expected to pass on a party line vote.
    And if it isn't stopped in the courts, it could end up costing you a bundle.
Net neutrality was designed to...

"Ensure internet providers do not throttle, slow down, or block any websites on the internet unless there's a technical reason to do so," says Shad Jessen, Director of IT Communications at BSU He adds that removing the rules means you could pay more for internet, and internet providers could slow down or block whatever websites they want so long as they are transparent.

But consider this.  If net neutrality were to go away, it is theoretically possible in the next election, your internet provider could restrict your access to your favorite candidate's website.
Equally disturbing to many businesses is that internet providers like Comcast or Verizon could restrict access to certain business websites in favor of others.
A prospect that Jessen says will likely lead to immediate lawsuits.

"I think immediately, the chance is this will heaxd to court," says Jessen, "This decision will be protested against by many organizations in court."
 The head of the FCC was previously a top lawyer for Verizon.
Ajit Pai's argument for the change is vague, "We want all kinds of companies, the startups of the future to be able to invest and innovate on the web, and the best way to do that is to ensure that everybody has the freedom to pursue a business plan that will serve their consumers well."
But Jessen says this will hurt startups and benefit big corporations.

"Big telecom companies like Comcast and Verizon will benefit the most." says Jessen.
It's possible a new administration could reinstall net neutrality, but critics of the FCC say they hope the courts step in to protect the rules from ever being removed in the first place.
Net neutrality is expected to be repealed tomorrow along party lines.
Barring any lawsuits, it would take several months before the change goes into effect.

Print this article Back to Top