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TSA finds two loaded guns at Boise Airport in less than a week

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Posted at 11:58 AM, Oct 04, 2016
and last updated 2016-10-04 15:46:19-04

Boise Police were notified after a man traveling to Las Vegas brought a .357 revolver loaded with six rounds of ammunition to the Transportation Security Administration security checkpoint at the Boise Airport Tuesday morning.

During routine screening of carry-on luggage, a TSA officer spotted the image of the firearm on the X-ray monitor and immediately notified the Boise Police Department. A law enforcement officer responded to the security checkpoint and confiscated the gun. The passenger was cited on the Idaho state charge of “Firearm at Checkpoint,” according to TSA spokeswoman Lorie Dankers.

“This is the second firearm in less than a week that TSA officers have intercepted at the Boise Airport security checkpoint,” she said. “On Friday morning, a male passenger traveling to San Diego brought a Ruger SP 101 revolver loaded with five rounds of ammunition. BPD cited this passenger on the state charge of ‘Firearm at Checkpoint.’” 

In both cases, there was no impact to airport operations.

There is no indication the incidents are connected, Dankers said.

These are the twelfth and thirteenth firearms TSA officers have discovered in carry-on baggage this year at the Boise Airport. During all of last year, TSA officers intercepted fourteen firearms at the Airport, according to a TSA news release.

"Passengers are 100% responsible for the contents of their carry-on and checked baggage,” said TSA Federal Security Director for Idaho Andy Coose. “The requirements for air travel are different than for other types of travel. The best piece of advice I can give is to carefully check your bags before you pack them to ensure you are aware of all the contents of your luggage prior to coming to the airport.”

Weapons -- including firearms, firearm parts and ammunition -- are not permitted in carry-on baggage, but can be transported in checked bags if they are unloaded, properly packed and declared to the airline, according to the TSA.

If a passenger brings a firearm to the TSA security checkpoint, the traveler can be cited by law enforcement on a local or state charge.

TSA will also levy a civil penalty against the passenger. The recommended civil penalty range is between $3,000 and $7,500.

TSA evaluates each incident on a case-by-case basis.

“TSA has multiple resources available to passengers to help them determine whether an item is permitted in carry-on baggage, checked baggage or not at all. For more information, visit www.tsa.gov/traveler-information/prohibited-items or use TSA's mobile app – myTSA,” Dankers pointed out.

“The myTSA app allows a traveler to enter the name of an item and the app will provide information on how to transport that item on board an aircraft. You can download myTSA app on iTunes or Google Play. The same information can also be accessed via any web browser at www.tsa.gov/mobile,” she said.