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Experts offer tips to help children with autism celebrate Halloween

Posted: 9:11 PM, Oct 08, 2019
Updated: 2019-10-08 23:11:57-04
Experts offer tips to help children with autism celebrate Halloween

Halloween can be a stressful time for all children given the nature the holiday. This can be especially true for children who have an autism spectrum disorder.

Although it might require some extra planning, experts offer tips to make Halloween enjoyable for children with autism.

The following tips are offered by the Children's Hospital Los Angeles :

  • Create a visual story of what Halloween may be like for your child, with some pictures or drawings. This will help your child prepare for the day’s activities.
  • Try on costumes before Halloween. If the costume is uncomfortable or doesn’t fit right, it may cause unnecessary distress and ruin their fun.
  • If your child does not like their costume, don’t make them wear it. Instead, talk about the situation with your child and try to uncover the reason why they don’t like it. After you talk with your child, they may gradually get used to the costume. Have them wear it for short periods of time and at increasing intervals over time.
  • Consider a Halloween costume that fits over your child’s regular clothes, such as butterfly wings or capes.
  • Practice going to a neighbor’s door, ringing the bell or knocking on the door and receiving candy.
  • Know your child’s limits and do only what he or she can handle. For example, if your child is not comfortable trick-or-treating, you can start by going to three houses. Assess how your child is doing and build up to more houses the following year.
  • Take your child to an activity in the community, such as a school festival or a neighborhood party where the child is already comfortable and knows people.
  • Partner with family and friends that your child likes.
  • If you are giving out candy at your home, give your child the option to give a piece of candy. During the day, practice greeting people and giving out candy.
  • If your child is afraid of going out at night, plan indoor or daytime Halloween activities.

One alternative for a traditional trick or treat is to do a trunk or treat. Many of these type of events are held during daytime hours in a more controlled atmosphere.

Autism Speaks has listed a number of events throughout the nation that are considered friendly for children with sensory disabilities. Click here to see a sampling of the events going on through the nation.