Nampa boy gets Christmas wish to be a cop

Nampa, ID - One Treasure Valley fourth grader received not only a very special gift but also a dream come true when his best friend teamed up with the Nampa Police Department.

Ten-year-old Jacob  Leinonen  attends Central Canyon Elementary.
Though he was born with many medical challenges, Jacob has not let them get in the way of pursuing his dream to become a police officer.
 
Monday his friend, Angelina Levy, and officer Aaron Coleman gave Jacob memories to last a life time.

"This is your wallet with your police badge so I'm making you my honorary Nampa police officer right now. so now you can officially go into the car," Said Aaron Coleman, Master Patrolman.

So it began Jacob's day as a Nampa Police Officer.
"It's amazing," Jacob said.

But that's certainly not where it ended. Weeks ago, Jacob told his friend his Christmas wish and Angelina immediately got to work to make it happen.

"It should be about these two little kids and because you have I want to make this dream come true for this little boy," Coleman said.

All Jacob asked for was that shiny police badge, but  Coleman talked with his chief and decided that the real police badge just wasn't enough.

"If we can do one thing, we can always do it better," Coleman said.

Coleman picked Jacob up from school and with Jacob as his partner in the front seat and friend Angelina and her twin, Isabella, in the back, Coleman headed off to police headquarters.  

Jacob said he was definitely surprised. "What the crap is going on? I was like am I in trouble? what happened?” Jacob said.

Jacob arrived at headquarters to a warm welcome from Nampa, PD including the police chief and K9 officer Newt.
Coleman and his fellow officers gave Jacob a guided tour, showing him everything from the patrol room to swat equipment and then on to dispatch — even letting Jacob put his police skills to the test.

After sharing a plate of cookies with Jacob and his friends, Officer Coleman presented Jacob with his own police "go bag" which was complete with patches, pens, miniature handcuffs and even a police challenge coin. 

The day was more than Jacob could have imagined.

"People think we get into police work because we want to arrest bad guys but no, that's not it at all," Coleman said.

It's times like this  he remembers the true meaning of the badge.

"This is the best part of the job," said Coleman.

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