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Museum of Broken Relationships travels to Boise

Posted at 8:35 PM, Feb 14, 2016
and last updated 2016-02-14 23:21:50-05
A magnifying glass, a broken dish, a set of guitar string. To some, they may seem like meaningless items, but to those who the items once belonged, it's a symbol of a broken heart. 
 
That's the premise behind the Museum of Broken Relationships.
 
"This exhibition has actually been to 25 different countries, and 37 different cities, well this is the 37th," said Jason Morales, founder of Ming Studios in downtown Boise. 
 
People from all around the world have donated items that stir up emotions from their lost love.
Each item comes with a story.
 
"You know obviously in some cases a broken heart leads to a lot of angst and anger, disappointment, and some of which is displayed humorous. Some of which is very hard to accept. But on the other side, sometimes these partings are very sweet, and there is still a lot of love between those who were in a relationship prior," said Morales.
 
Among the items from all over the world, a star chart from China, a camera from Singapore, a wedding dress from Colorado. There are even items from people right here in the gem state. 
 
"A can of beer unopened and 30 years old was submitted here in Idaho," explained Morales. "One of the things that was really interesting in Boise in particular is four wedding rings were submitted to the collection."
 
While the majority of the relics are completely ordinary, items you'd see everyday, it's the story behind them that makes them unique to each and every individual.
 
"All of us project a lot of interest and context into things that other people don't necessarily identify with or recognize as being so special, but we know they are special, because they were special to us for some reason," said Morales.
 
Just because the relationships didn't last a lifetime, not all love was lost. Many finding the silver lining in setting those memories free. 
 
"You know you have these objects that you hold on to but there is something maybe cathartic and informed about letting it go, and kind of turning it over," said Morales. "I think for all of us who have experienced a broken relationship in our past, and hopefully have moved on to new ones, those previous relationships help build who we are, and are a key part of where we are going."
 
To learn more about the exhibit, times, and location, CLICK HERE