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Judge rules Boise mass stabbing suspect mentally unfit to stand trial, Idahoans react

Posted at 4:41 PM, Jan 16, 2019
and last updated 2019-01-17 00:25:11-05

BOISE — "Dangerously mentally ill" -- just one of the phrases Fourth District Court Judge Nancy Baskin used to describe Timmy Kinner today, as she ruled him unfit to stand trial.

Idahoans are now reacting.

"Yeah I just think that it's a given. No one goes out and kills a child-- a three-year old defenseless child-- and they're sane," said Brianna Martin, a Nampa resident.

Kinner, the 31-year-old suspect in a Boise mass stabbing, will now be committed to IDOC's nine-bed secure mental health facility. Martin says the family of late victim Ruya Kadir is on her mind.

"And having a three-year-old myself like I could not imagine what they're going through right now. So, it really breaks my heart."

The judge writes that Kinner presents a "substantial risk of physical harm to other persons as manifested by the evidence of violent behavior alleged in the indictments, as well as his prior criminal history and conduct while in custody..."

Martin says she respects the judge's decision, but, she says at the same time, "He took a little innocent girls life, and he did not show her any mercy, and he didn't show anyone any kindness or mercy and I don't think he deserves to be treated the same way."

In order to help Kinner become mentally competent, Department of Correction authorities will give him "involuntary necessary treatment" and will submit reports on his progress. After 90 days, if Kinner is then still not mentally fit for trial, the judge could order Kinner to stay at the facility for an additional six months.

"I feel really really bad for the family and that they have to continue to go through this-- and not get justice right away for their daughter."

Kinner was scheduled to stand trial in January of next year for first-degree murder and 12 felonies in connection with the stabbing of nine people at the Wylie Street Station Apartments last June. Kadir, who was celebrating her third birthday, died from her injuries.

"My kids were right with me and I cried and I cried when I read it because I thought, 'What if that was my babies?'"

In a separate courtcase, Kadir's mother is seeking a jury trial against five defendants, including the Northwest Real Estate Capital Corporation, a local nonprofit that owns the Wylie Street Station apartment complex, and the Tamarack Property Management Co., which manages the complex.