Donations needed for Plantation Island bridge restoration

GARDEN CITY -  

An update on the Plantation Island bridge along the greenbelt in Garden City which was damaged during the high water levels of the Boise River in early 2017. The bridge had to be removed, for fear the bridge would fall into the river, leaving a portion of the greenbelt blocked off.

Now, the Idaho Foundation for Parks and Lands, a public benefit nonprofit which owns the land, is asking for the public's help raising the rest of the funding to place the bridge back over the river.

"We are in the fundraising efforts right now to raise a minimum of $75,000 to contribute along with FEMA funding that we were just approved for," says Stephani Hilding, Treasurer for IFPL.

FEMA funding the organization received in June of this year after Governor Otter's emergency declaration for the flooding event allowed IFPL to apply for the grant, giving the organization around $120,000.

But that isn't quite enough; total restoration will take up to $200,000.

The bridge is structurally sound. However, the dirt below the abutments started washing away during the flooding last year. But, once the funding is received, that same original bridge will go back over this Garden City portion of the Boise River. Saving a lot of money because that original bridge can be used. Now, Residents just want to know when they'll have it back.

"The other side of the river, the condition of that greenbelt was really nice. The condition on this side is not as good. So it keeps you from riding that nicer stretch," says Treasure Valley resident Rick Feeser.

And it seems many of the greenbelt travelers say they would be willing to donate to the cause, to create more convenience along the trail.

"We either have to walk all the way up to Glenwood or all the way to Veteran's, and we're on 51st. It'd be nice if there was a way to get across the river without swimming," says Treasure Valley resident Damian Reusser.

If you would like to donate to the efforts of restoring the bridge, head to IdahoLands.org.

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