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‘Always an unforgettable pillar.’ Former Boise police chief dies

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‘Always an unforgettable pillar.’ Former Boise police chief dies
Posted at 12:59 PM, Oct 22, 2020
and last updated 2020-10-23 10:22:31-04

BOISE, Idaho — Larry Paulson, a former Boise chief of police, died Wednesday.

Paulson had been recovering from a broken ankle since the summer, Deputy Chief Ron Winegar said in an email to the Boise Police Department, and he fell down the stairs of his home. He was taken to Saint Alphonsus Hospital, where he later died with his wife, Kay, by his side.

He joined the police department in 1968 and was named chief of police in 1993. During his time as chief, Officer Mark Stall was killed in the line of duty, the first such death known in the history of the Boise Police Department.

“During our darkest days following the death of Officer Mark Stall, it was his strength that we leaned on while we all grieved,” Winegar wrote. “Chief Paulson will always be an unforgettable pillar of this department, and his loss is deeply felt.”

Paulson retired in 2000 after 31 years with the department. He remained involved in the community, including speaking at events honoring Stall’s life.

Mayor Lauren McLean offered condolences to his friends and family.

“He was respected by those he worked with and those he led,” she said in an emailed statement. “Those who served with him tell stories of his warmth, kindness, sincerity, and how deeply he cared for those around him. As Boise mourned the death of Officer Mark Stall, Chief Paulson showed us how to grieve and how to persevere. Boise will be using those lessons as we mourn him today.”

Paulson is survived by his wife, Kay, and his daughters Jodi, Kristi and Mindi.

The Boise Police Department said in a social media post that information will be coming in the next few days about funeral services. Boise Police Honor Guard will be guarding the Chief until internment and the department will be providing police escorts as needed.

Portions of this article were written by Hayley Harding of the Idaho Statesman.