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9th Circuit upholds endangered species protections for Yellowstone grizzlies

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Posted at 2:37 PM, Jul 08, 2020
and last updated 2020-07-08 16:37:43-04

The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals today upheld the Montana District Court's opinion that reinstated Endangered Species Act protections for the Yellowstone region's grizzly bear population. The decision spares the grizzlies from plans for trophy hunts in the states of Wyoming and Idaho.

Earthjustice, representing the Northern Cheyenne Tribe, Sierra Club, Center for Biological Diversity and National Parks Conservation Association, argued for restoring protections to Yellowstone grizzly bears.

"This is a tremendous victory for those who care about Yellowstone and its grizzly bears," said Tim Preso, Earthjustice attorney. "The court rightfully rejected the misguided proposal to subject Yellowstone grizzlies to trophy hunting for the first time in 40 years. The grizzly is an icon of our remaining wildness at a time when our wilderness is shrinking and our wildlife is under assault."

"This is a tremendous victory for all who cherish Yellowstone's grizzly bears and for those who've worked to ensure they're protected under the Endangered Species Act," said Andrea Zaccardi, a senior attorney with the Center for Biological Diversity. "Grizzlies still have a long way to go before recovery. Hunting these beautiful animals around America's most treasured national park should never again be an option."

"We are thrilled with the court's decision to uphold still-needed Endangered Species protections for Yellowstone's beloved grizzly bears," said Bonnie Rice, a senior representative with Sierra Club's Our Wild America Campaign. "Given the rapid pace of the extinction and climate crises, now is not the time to remove critical safeguards that will ensure Yellowstone's irreplaceable grizzlies stay on the road to recovery."

"The importance of this court ruling for the grizzly bears found in our most iconic national parks cannot be overstated," said Stephanie Adams, Northern Rockies Associate Director for the National Parks Conservation Association. "This decision sets the stage for practical, science-based and on-the-ground collaboration to ensure a healthy future for grizzlies in Grand Teton, Yellowstone and beyond. And now, communities can continue their work to create opportunities to safely connect the grizzly bears of Yellowstone and Glacier."