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One Magic Valley historical site wants to reopen, but it needs community help.

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Posted at 5:25 PM, Apr 20, 2021
and last updated 2021-04-21 19:15:04-04

HANSEN, Idaho — The Magic Valley’s oldest historical homestead is asking for the community's help in re-opening after a year of being shut down.

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The Magic Valley’s oldest historical homestead is asking for the community's help in re-opening after a year of being shut down.

The Rock Creek Station and the Stricker homesite in Hansen serves as a reminder of life in the old west. It is home to the original Rock Creek Store built-in 1865, and the small community that grew up around the business.

The historical site is currently owned by the State of Idaho. Along with the Rock Creek Store, the site includes the original 1900 farmhouse of Herman Stricker and his wife Lucy Walgamott. They owned the Rock Creek Store and the saloon, which was often the stopping place for settlers and travelers.

“It pre-dates Twin Falls," said Lisa Douda, a volunteer for the Stricker Homesite. "It is on the Oregon Trail, and at one point it was your only stop between Fort Hall and Fort Boise.”

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Rock Creek Store built in 1865.

The site is operated by a group of volunteers, known as the Friends of Stricker. For more than a year their efforts to educate the public on the area’s rich past have decreased due to the closure of the site for COVID-19. Their last event was on March 13, 2020.

“We are really not a big board," said Douda. “We are not a big group of volunteers so it does take us a lot to get things done.”

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Inside of the Rock Creek Store built in 1865.

After being closed for more than a year, there is a lot more work that needs to be done before their re-opening expected in June. On Saturday the site is inviting the community to get involved and participate in their community workday from 9 a.m. to1 p.m.

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A dress that belonged to Lucy Walgamott

“It is our responsibility as citizens of this community to take care of our history,” Douda said. “If it goes away it is gone, and you can’t get that back."