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Magic Valley sees an increase in COVID-19 cases

Posted at 6:41 PM, Jul 09, 2020
and last updated 2020-07-10 08:11:48-04

MAGIC VALLEY, Idaho — As businesses begin to reopen, COVID-19 cases continue to surge. Last week, Twin Falls County saw 109 new confirmed cases, the highest since the beginning of the pandemic.

The South Central Public Health District says the main reason for this is that people do not take the proper precautions when going out into the community.

"In all of our counties, the majority of the cases we are seeing are spread out. There is no real trending cause for any of them. This means that people are going out into the community and are getting infected as they do so," Brianna Bodily, Public Information Officer of The South Central Public Health District, said.

In the week of June 28th-July 3rd, Twin Falls County saw 109 confirmed cases, Minidoka County had 44 new cases, and Cassia County had 33 new cases. The South Central Public Health District says these numbers account for confirmed cases only and do not include probable cases.

They say these are the highest number of cases they have seen since the beginning of the pandemic.

"Our region is not ready yet to go back to complete normal. I want just as much as anybody else wants, to be able to go to the grocery store, to be able to pick up food every once in a while, to be able to see friends. And to be able to do those very normal wonderful, social things we need to take simple precautions," Bodily said.

The last highest count of new confirmed cases in Twin Falls County was the week of May 17, with the county seeing a total of 69 new confirmed cases in that week alone.

"This isn't something that should cause you to be afraid. This isn't something that should make you hide away in your home. This isn't something to be incredibly alarming. It's just something to keep in mind if you want to stay healthy so that you can take preventative measures," Bodily said.

They say an essential factor to keep the number of new confirmed cases from rising significantly is taking the proper precautions.

"We need to take simple precautions. Wear a mask when you go to the grocery store, stay six feet away from people you don't live with, wash your hands frequently, and stay home when you're sick," Bodily said.