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How the stay-at-home order is affecting domestic violence survivors

Posted at 5:42 PM, Apr 27, 2020
and last updated 2020-04-28 08:52:07-04

TWIN FALLS, Idaho — The stay-at-home order is affecting people in many different ways. For survivors of domestic violence, being quarantined with their abuser means having a new burden to worry about.

“Let’s say I was abused, because of the quarantine order, if I were to end up having a bruise or something happened I would actually have a better excuse for not going out because then that would give a chance for the bruise to go away," Kandy Hutson, a domestic violence survivor and Boise resident, says.

Hutson was in an abusive relationship for 22 years and tells Idaho News 6, if she would have gone through the abuse during the stay-at-home order, it is something she believes her abusive spouse would have enjoyed.

“In some ways my spouse would have liked it a little more because you know it’s more like a control type thing you know now you’re forced to stay home, you can’t go out in public," Hutson says.

Although compared to last year, the Twin Falls Police Department reports no increase in domestic violence calls, Hutson believes some of that could be due to people thinking their calls won't be taken as serious right now.

"If you're in an abusive relationship, give them a call. Everything is still working you can still get your protection order, you can still speak with victim witness coordinators. Everything is as it was before," Hutson said.

When the stay-at-home order was put into place, some organizations knew the need for support with domestic violence was going to rise, this is why some organizations like Faces of Hope prepared to be able to still provide support during this time.

“I know that the safety order is meant to keep us safe, but sometimes when you’re living with an abuser it could be the most dangerous place to be and as tensions grow it really could be a dangerous place. And so for people to know you can come to faces for help if you are unsafe we are an essential service and we’re open," Paige Dinger, Executive Director of Faces of Hope, said.

Some police departments throughout the country even added different ways for people to able to reach out for support during this time.

“I know that the safety order is meant to keep us safe, but sometimes when you’re living with an abuser it could be the most dangerous place to be and as tensions grow it really could be a dangerous place. And so for people to know you can come to faces for help if you are unsafe we are an essential service and we’re open," Kim Burkhalper, victims service coordinator of the Twin Falls Police Department, said.

If you or someone you know needs support during this time visit Faces of Hope in Boise or Voices against violence in Twin Falls.